Going Rawr – How To Switch To a Raw Food Diet For Your Dog

Going Rawr – How To Switch To a Raw Food Diet For Your Dog

There has been a lot of coverage recently on the telly about a raw food diet for dogs and the benefits and/or risks associated with this. Now I know a lot of people are considering trying it or would like at least to know more – perhaps you are worried about the cost in time and money, and the issue of food contamination. So I was excited to have come across this book by Maggie Rhines called “Going Rawr! Dog Lover’s Compendium”. Forget about stuffy old textbooks. This book, which is come in downloadable format as an ebook, gets into the practical nitty-gritty of feeding your dog raw food. It has good tips and lists on how to start and then continue your dog on this type of diet: from sourcing your food (we have found Morrisons supermarket and our local butcher to be great sources), handling, preparing, storing and serving it. So no matter if you’ve got an 8 week old puppy or an old boy or gal, you’ll soon be feeding them a healthy raw food diet (as nature intended) in no time at all! Definitely something you should read BEFORE you start your dog on a raw food diet. Get the full scoop here:...

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CPR For Dogs

CPR For Dogs

This was shared with me on facebook and I thought it was really useful – something we ought to know how to do. We are forever taking Hank out, in sometimes remote places, either running or walking and he could need medical attention if he had a mishap while he was zooming about. It’s good to know what to do.

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What should my dog’s poop look like?

What should my dog’s poop look like?

Since getting Hank, 3 months ago at the time of writing this, his dog poo has become something that we have almost obsessed about or at the very least talked about every day – and I know we are not alone. It’s quite obvious that looking at your dog’s poo gives you are very quick indicator on their state of health. We were told that Hank had a delicate stomach and that his stools were unpredictable and this was the case. Even though he was on a premium dry food diet his poo was always on the soft side and quite voluminous – two or three times a day. The picture of his poo below in the pooper-scooper was the best that it would be and more often than not was a lot softer. Anyway after a month or so on the dry food diet, and as a follow on from his unfortunate diarrhoea episode, we decided to switch to a raw diet and just like everyone says the immediately noticeable change was in his poo. Less than 24 hours after his first raw meal his faeces were transformed! Basically his stools came out firm to touch – making them so much more easy to pick up in the doggy bag. Of course having firm stools is also important for your dog’s anal glands which need to be stimulated by the pressure of passing firm stools. If you always have soft stools this can result in the anal glands needing manual stimulation and squeezing – something that is not that pleasant to do apparently and also is not great for your dog. And the other surprising things was that there was significantly less poo as well. It seemed as if he was actually absorbing more of his meal and therefore creating less waste out the backend! As part of our research into the raw food diet, etc. I came across this great poo chart kindly produced by one of the dog food manufacturers. The important thing to note is that “Score 3” is the ideal, with scores of 2 and 4 also being acceptable. Now 2 months into his raw diet we can unequivocally say that Hank’s poo is 95% of the time with score 3. I would say that Hank didn’t really have a delicate stomach he just needed the right diet for him which happens to be a raw diet. We are definitely not going back to a dry food diet. Do you have similar or differing examples of how changing your dog’s diet changed their...

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What to do if your dog gets diarrhoea?

What to do if your dog gets diarrhoea?

So last week before we transferred Hank onto his new “RAW” diet we had an unfortunate diarrhoea accident in the house. We think it was caused by us adding some grated cheese to his mix in an attempt to put some weight on him. After the initial diarrhoea it was quite worrying to see that was coming out was watery mucus but that meant that he’d cleared his system at least. So then after skipping a meal we put him on the following: DAY 1: pumpkin (not already sweetened pumpkin for pie filling but a can of plain pumpkin); DAY 2: pumpkin & rice (cooked); DAY 3: pumpkin & rice added to his regular dry food. We also added the powder from two 370mg capsules of Slippery Elm Bark to some previously boiled water and then mixed that in for the first 2 days. Of course we made sure to encourage him to drink as much as we could to help him flush out his system and stop him getting dehydrated. Obviously if the diarrhoea continued we would have consulted the vet but this little routine seemed to settle his bowels quite quickly (but then the whole thing was quite possibly just the cheese that triggered the bout). I’m happy to say he’s as right as rain now and in fact nearly a week into his “raw” food diet which will be another post.  Needless to say the change in poo with the raw diet is immediately apparent… (more later on...

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Why Dogs Eat Poo!

Why Dogs Eat Poo!

So in my research about dog health I discovered that if you have a dog at some point you will probably catch it trying to eat its own or other animals’ poo (or “poop” as it is more politely known in America) – and while it is disgusting, unattractive and, as expected, potentially unsafe for your dog, it is actually fairly common behaviour. The eating of poo, officially known as coprophagia, can be a sign of some deeper anxiety or nutritional issue with your dog. Why Do They Do It? Dogs will eat poo for any number of reasons. Some simple explanations may be that they hungry or they might be trying to clean up their space. So if you do not feed your dog enough or if they are in a dirty pen, they will try to resolve these issues, which can often lead them to resort to eating their own excrement. More complex reasons for dogs eating poo may be that a dog might not be getting enough nutrients for itself due to it having parasites or worms, or they simply might not be getting the nutrients they need from the dry food they receive each day. Another reason may be that it is just an anxious habit, or more bizarrely they may be trying to mimic your behaviour because they see you always picking up their poo. Alternatively it could just be them copying other dogs that they have seen eating poo. New mums with their litters clean up after the puppies by eating their poo so some puppies may copy this natural cleaning behaviour from their mother. The good news is that no matter what the reason for the poo eating it is usually relatively easy to stop. How to Adjust the Behaviour So the first thing to do when you first start to notice your dog eating poo is to check for any health problems. Dogs that eat poo regularly could have worms or other parasites, or may not have enough food so seek advice from your vet to determine why this is happening and then treat it immediately. If your dog gets a clean bill of health from the vet and they don’t have any other obvious problems that could be directly attributed to the issue, then you need to address whatever other problems might be causing them to eat poo. Start by keeping the garden clean of poo. Also check the paths near your home. Clean up every day. If the coprophagia is not caused by a health problem then it isn’t important why your dog eats poo. This is because the problem is likely to be behavioural and thus can be...

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